Robert Lewis Wellener

Robert Wellener

Robert Wellener

Robert Lewis Wellener, 94, passed peacefully away in his home Sunday morning, in Kirkland, WA October 30th, 2016.  Bob was a Decorated Navy Pilot, flying off carriers during WWII and in the Korean Conflict.  Retiring from the Navy after 30 years of service in 1974.  He was married to Marjorie Dorothy Sandal Wellener, who robert-lewis-wellenerproceeded him in death in 1995.  They were married for almost 50 years.  His joy, in addition to his family, were his horses and his sail boat the Triumph.   His first boat, named “Mom’s Mercedes” was purchased in 1980 and then he upgraded to the 35’ “Triumph” in 1982, where he enjoyed many years of sailing.  His favorite ports to stay were Friday Harbor on San Juan Island and Roche Harbor, also on San Juan Island. robert-wellener

He is survived by his brother John Thomas Wellener, of Baltimore MD, his three children, Christopher Wellener (Michael Farmer) Anne Wellener and Jane Berard (Brian Berard).  Six Grandchildren, Beau Gunnyon, Janette Marx (Matthew Marx) Kalli Gunnyon, Elizabeth Haney (Justin Haney) Rachel Lucas (Barry Lucas) and Robert Wellener.  Also by his 7 Great Grandchildren, Caitlynn Haney, Nicholas Haney, Alexis Haney, Kimber Lucas, Blake Lucas and Christopher and Kylie Marx.

 

In Lieu of flowers, please send donations to the American Cancer Society.

Prayer service @ St Johns Episcopal Kirkland    105 State St S, Kirkland,  WA  98033  @  12:00PM  (Noon) Friday November 11th, 2016

 

Prayer for the Navy

O Eternal Lord God, who alone spreadest out the heavens, and rulest the raging of the sea; Vouchsafe to take into thy almighty and most gracious protection our country’s Navy, and all who serve therein.  Preserve them from the dangers of the sea, and from the violence of the enemy; that they may be a safeguard unto the United States of America, and a security for such as pass on the seas upon their lawful occasions; that the inhabitants of our land may in peace and quietness serve the our God, to the glory of thy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen

7 Responses to “Robert Lewis Wellener”

  • Jane Berard says:

    Daddy I miss you. Love you so, Blessings in Heaven. I’m lost without you.

  • Kalli gunnyon says:

    Love you always. So glad I was gifted with having the best Papa. I will cherish your memory forever. ❤

  • Michael Liedberg says:

    He is a great man. I am honored to have known him. Rest in peace.

  • Barb Murphy says:

    To my Dear Uncle Bob, there are so many fond memories, holidays and laughter to share with family. You encouraged me to get back on Zi when I fell off during a jump! You said show your sportsmanship and get back on. With a smile and no fear I did. You were a strong man and a loving Uncle with a big heart. I will always hold a place in my heart for you along with my Aunt Marge and family that has gone on to Heaven. I miss everyone dearly. I love you Uncle Bob always Barb Carlson-Murphy.

  • Beau Gunnyon says:

    Papa,
    You were a great influence in my life. Apart from my own Father, I was blessed to learn and hope to emulate the great ideals that have been engrained in me from a very young age. Will love and miss you forever.
    Goodbye to a truly great Man and Human Being. The world is less without you.

  • Doug says:

    Bob was a WWII Navy carrier pilot, but his love of the sea went far deeper. Bob devoted much of his free time to sailing his 35′ sloop and was a highly accomplished mariner.
    In accordance with his wishes, his ashes will be scattered at sea from his sailboat.
    In keeping therewith, is the short poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson, “Crossing The Bar.”
    Written in 1889, the poem is a nautical metaphor for the transition from life to death.
    The harbor with its moorings and shallow water is Life. The Bar, or sandbar, is the line or point separating life from death. The Boundless Deep, Twighlight, Evening Bell and the Dark are of course the Afterlife.
    The poem brings to mind the soul-stirring symphony by Richard Strauss – Death and Transfiguration, in which the soul perseveres through life’s trials and then victorious in death, soars in heavenly transformation.

    Crossing The Bar

    Sunset and evening star,
    and one clear call for me!
    And may there be no moaning of the bar,
    When I put out to sea.

    But such a tide as moving seems asleep,
    Too full for sound and foam,
    When that which drew from out the
    boundless deep,
    Turns again home.

    Twilight and evening bell,
    And after that the dark!
    And may there be no sadness of farewell,
    When I embark.

    For tho’ from out our bourne
    of Time and Place
    The flood may bear me far,
    I hope to see my Pilot face to face
    When I have crost the bar.

    Alfred Lord Tennyson

  • Doug says:

    Bob was a decorated WWII Navy carrier pilot who saw action in the Pacific. His love of the sea went far deeper though. While living in Washington, Bob & Marge would own two sailboats; the last being a beautiful 35′ sloop, “Triumph”.
    For many years, Bob sailed his boats all over Puget Sound, through the San Juan’s, and up around Vancouver Island. In addition to his many other talents, Bob was an accomplished mariner.
    In accordance with his wishes, his ashes will be scattered at sea from his sloop the Triumph.
    In keeping with his love of the sea and sailing; the poem; “Crossing The Bar” by Alfred Lord Tennyson also seems most apropos.
    Written in 1889, this short poem is a fitting elegy and tribute to those like Bob who loved the sea and the boats they sailed on her.
    Crossing The Bar is a nautical metaphor for the seafarer’s last voyage – the transition from life to death, and it is beautifully described by Tennyson.
    The “Harbor” with it’s moorings and shallow water, is Life. The “Bar” (small sandbar at harbor’s mouth) is the barrier between life and death. Finally, the “Boundless Deep”, “Twilight”, “Evening Bell” and the “Dark” are allegorical of the Afterlife.
    This bit of 19th century verse celebrates the soaring of the soul, and the victory of life over death in the world to come.

    Crossing The Bar

    Sunset and evening star,
    and one clear call for me!
    And may there be no moaning of the bar,
    When I put out to sea.

    But such a tide as moving seems asleep,
    Too full for sound and foam,
    when that which drew from out the boundless deep,
    Turns again home.

    Twilight and evening bell,
    And after that the dark!
    And may there be no sadness of farewell,
    When I embark.

    For tho’ from out our bourne
    of Time and Place,
    The flood may bear me far,
    I hope to see my Pilot face to face,
    When I have crost the bar.

    Alfred Lord Tennyson – 1889

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